Hiking & Climbing

There are several locations around Egypt that are ideally suited for active travelers looking for unique challenges.

If your trip is Cairo-based, you can head 150 km southwest of the city to the desert oasis of Fayoum , where you’ll find Wadi al-Hitan (Valley of the Whales)—a UNESCO World Heritage Site, designated as such for its natural wonders. You’ll find easy hiking trails through this fascinating valley filled with prehistoric whale fossils.

More serious climbers will want to move further away from the cities to the Sinai Peninsula, which is home to prime hiking and climbing spots covering the vast wilderness and rugged peaks of the Sinai Mountains.

For a scenic coastal trail

The trek between the Blue Hole near Dahab and Ras Abu Gallum is astonishingly beautiful. If you’re heading to Nuweiba, make sure to stop by the Colored Canyon for an easy hike through the 800-meter-long, multi-hued ravine.


On the mainland

Wadi al-Gemal Nature Reserve near Hurghada and Marsa Alam has several trails—including a trek up Mount Hamata—and offers an exploration of prehistoric rock art, Ptolemaic ruins, and remnants of the Roman empire.


250 km south of Marsa Alam lies Gabal Elba National Park

Spanning a whopping 35,600 sq km of mountainous terrain and coastal desert plains. Gabal Elba, or Elba Mountain, stands at 1,435 m above sea level overlooking the stunning coastal plains and the Red Sea.


DISCOVER

Hidden Gems

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The Sinai Trail, a hiking trek that spans a total of 550 km, broken up into four sections for shorter hiking trips. Serious hikers will want to experience the full trail, which takes 54 days to complete. Eight different Bedouin tribes are involved in guiding hikers through numerous mountains, natural pools, and historic ruins, including the world-famous Mount Saint Catherine and Mount Sinai, a 2,285-meter-high mountain climb with breathtaking views at its summit.

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The Red Sea Mountain Trail. Hailed as the “ultimate sustainable tourism project,” this 170-km trail—operated by the indigenous Ma’aza tribe—takes you through the raw wilderness of the desert to explore Roman ruins, prehistoric rock art, and the rugged peaks and valleys of the Red Sea Mountains. If you’re not up to the full, multi-day hike, the trek can also be broken down into shorter trips

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